Changing Lives: One Apple At A Time...

Feb 17, 2012 by

Today’s Foodie Friday takes a different focus.  Have you ever heard of a “food desert?” I hadn’t until a few weeks ago when my girlfriend Deborah and I saw the documentary film  The Apple Pushers at the  Atlanta Jewish Film Festival. I walked into the theatre expecting to see a movie about food carts in New York. I walked out with an appreciation of how a small “green cart” can change people’s lives. I also left with the a greater understanding that knowledge alone will not right obesity. Nor will information on how to eat healthy lead to nutritious food choices. Oh sure it’s important to know about the food groups or the new “food plate.” However, easy and affordable access to fruits and vegetables is often the critical missing link.  As I munch on an apple while...

read more

Why Milliennials Won’t Get A Cold War...

Jan 18, 2012 by

Recently over a long holiday weekend, I had the opportunity to see Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy the movie, an adaptation of the now famous John Le Carré (nom de plume of David John Moore Cornwell) novel – part of a series that focuses on character George Smiley. Gary Oldham is in an Oscar-worthy role as George Smiley and is the number 2 in command to Control, played brilliantly by John Hurt.  While I strongly recommend this very character-driven movie, I realize that it is not for everyone. Especially if you are into blow-em-up Hollywood blockbusters – this one is meant for those bookish types who prefer politics and intrigue to titillation and special effects. That said, my friend Michael Fuller, an old-school chap from London, escorted me. He chortled that I was a mere babe...

read more

Separate but not Sequel

Jan 9, 2012 by

Have you ever had high hopes or expectations when you entered into something? A new job, a second date, or that perfect black dress that arrived mail-order. You know what I am referring to. Recently my dear friend Mary and her husband Craig, invited me to see the re-make of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. David Fincher’s initial version to the Stieg Larsson’s Millennium  trilogy made famous by Noomi Rapacei. Larsson witnessed the gang rape of a young girl when he was 15. He never forgave himself for failing to help the girl, whose name was Lisbeth – like the young main character of his books, herself a rape victim, which inspired the theme of sexual violence against women in his books. Maybe I should not have read the books, or seen the original trilogy in Swedish – by...

read more