The Hardest Part of Changing the World

Reaching People's Hearts

Feb 13, 2012 by

I had a post almost finished.  All about how for (less than) 40 cents a day you could help save at least a small part of the world.  Our big “ask” for our readers (and my fellow atsgfers) to step up and help us help others.  But…you’ve heard it all before, haven’t you?  If not from me, from about a thousand other worthy causes. (I’ve been writing about our Adopt A Village project for several weeks here, on my blog and on Lipsticking.)

 Then, I talked to Leslie Kahihikolo of GHNI and scrapped the post. Started over. 

I asked Leslie why she got involved with GHNI.  Long story short, because the people touched her heart.  She saw up close what GHNI does.  Met the people behind the pleas. Got her hands (literally) dirty. (That’s her, planting coffee trees.)  Taught some classes.  Made deep, life-long connections.

As she was talking, I could hear the happiness and fulfillment in her voice.  She is making a real difference, not just talking or typing about it.

“What’s the hardest part of your job?” I asked.   A silence. A sigh. The energy level immediately dropped. I could practically hear it over the miles between Hawaii and New Mexico.

 “I guess, trying to get people to understand the vision.”  

Ah, as I told her, I can relate.  I’ve done fundraising for years, and there’s nothing more disheartening than sitting across from a woman who could easily write a check for thousands of dollars (and never miss it) and watching her shut down as I make my impassioned plea.  Nope. Nada. Didn’t reach her heart, so that checkbook is never going to open.

Of course, that said, there are many people who do give generously and open their hearts almost immediately.  (Thanks Toby and Yvonne!)

The “trick” is finding and connecting with them.  (Funny, in my experience, the small businesses and less affluent give more than the big companies and the wealthy.)

So, here’s hoping I’ve connected with you over the past year, as I’ve written posts about everything from butter to dating. Why not celebrate the one-year anniversary of All The Single Girlfriends by making some new GFs in Indonesia?  

You can join the village of Tanah Keke right now. Easy-peasy. $12/month (that 40 cents a day. Actually 39.5 cents) automatically every month, using a credit card.

What does joining mean?  From GHNI: “Joining Tanah Keke means that you are not simply a donor or supporter, but an extended member of our village.

We want to get to know you and we want you to get to know us as we strive to sustainably transform our community. With GHNI’s help we are addressing our critical needs in the 5 areas of Water, Food, Wellness, Income and Education though GHNI’s method of Transformational Community Development (TCD). ”

P.S. They’re planning a trip to Indonesia in May for us fellow villagers.  I’m (still) hoping I can go.  It’d be great if you can make it.  I hear from Leslie and others that a trip  will literally change your life (and your heart.)


About the Author

Mary Schmidt Has Written 26 Articles For Us!

Mary is a proud Corporate America refugee, having long ago decided that quality of life is far more important than quantity of stuff. However, that said, she thinks money is a very good thing - when used as a tool, not a success measurement. In addition to writing for us, she blogs about business development and marketing at www.maryschmidt.com and about marketing to and by women at www.lipsticking.com. In her consulting business, her clients have ranged from mega-corps such as Hewlett-Packard to local Mom & Pops.
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